Monday, December 07, 2009

I Have A Job for My Pro-Life Friends.

We Can't Avert Our Eyes From China's Forced Abortions - Baltimore Sun
The answer is simple and brutal: A woman pregnant without permission has to surrender her unborn child to government enforcers, no matter what the stage of fetal development.

Late-term abortions are problematic, but the Chinese are nothing if not efficient. On one Web site for Chinese obstetricians and gynecologists, docs recently traded tips in a discussion titled: "What if the infant is still alive after induced labor?" ChinaAid translated a thread regarding an 8-month-old fetus that survived the procedure.

"Xuexia" wrote: "Actually, you should have punctured the fetus' skull." Another poster, "Damohuyang," wrote that most late-term infants died during induced labor, some lived and "would be left in trash cans. Some of them could still live for one to two days."


Thursday, December 03, 2009

Op-Ed Contributor - A Cloud Still Hangs Over Bhopal - NYTimes.com

Op-Ed Contributor - A Cloud Still Hangs Over Bhopal - NYTimes.com: "This is the 25th anniversary of the Bhopal gas disaster, an epic mess that started one night when a pesticide plant owned by the American chemical giant Union Carbide leaked a cloud of poisonous gas. Before the sun rose, almost 4,000 human beings capable of love and anguish sank to their knees and did not get up. Half a million more fell ill, many with severely damaged lungs and eyes.

An additional 15,000 people have since died from the aftereffects, and 10 to 30 people are said to die every month from exposure to the hundreds of tons of toxic waste left over in the former factory. But amazingly, the site still has not been cleaned up, because Dow Chemical, which since acquired Union Carbide, refuses to accept any responsibility. The groundwater is contaminated; children of the survivors suffer from genetic abnormalities; and the victims have long since run out of their measly compensation and are begging on the streets."

Balance of power. Or Why you should never get married.

Many Dads Asking For Changes In Child Support - News Story - WFTV Orlando
Eyewitness News found a local teacher who's only bringing home around $50 per week. A family court child support decision left him struggling to live and Eyewitness News found out it is not an isolated case.

"I was left with $58 a week," science teacher John Nelson said.

The court garnished most of his pay for child support, leaving him with around $200 per month.

"I could probably panhandle at the corner (of the interstate) and make more money," he said.


Many Dads Asking For Changes In Child Support - News Story - WFTV Orlando

Many Dads Asking For Changes In Child Support - News Story - WFTV Orlando: "Eyewitness News found a local teacher who's only bringing home around $50 per week. A family court child support decision left him struggling to live and Eyewitness News found out it is not an isolated case.

'I was left with $58 a week,' science teacher John Nelson said.

The court garnished most of his pay for child support, leaving him with around $200 per month.

'I could probably panhandle at the corner (of the interstate) and make more money,' he said."

Wednesday, December 02, 2009

You Are Paying Sprint to Spy On You.

Sprint fed customer GPS data to cops over 8 million times
Christopher Soghoian, a graduate student at Indiana University's School of Informatics and Computing, has made public an audio recording of Sprint/Nextel's Electronic Surveillance Manager describing how his company has provided GPS location data about its wireless customers to law enforcement over 8 million times. That's potentially millions of Sprint/Nextel customers who not only were probably unaware that their wireless provider even had an Electronic Surveillance Department, but who certainly did not know that law enforcement offers could log into a special Sprint Web portal and, without ever having to demonstrate probable cause to a judge, gain access to geolocation logs detailing where they've been and where they are.


Because 3,000 American Lives were not the issue, Oil was, Oil in Iraq.

A Crushing Legacy of Bush | The New York Observer
It would be much less fair, however, to ignore the events that led us to this moment, when whatever choice he makes will offer no great guarantee of progress and no small prospect of trouble.

Those events began with the inexplicable decision by officials of the previous administration to allow Osama bin Laden, Ayman al-Zawahiri and other ranking leaders of Al Qaeda to escape from Afghanistan to Pakistan in December 2001. At the time, as a new Senate report on the battle of Tora Bora recalls, Donald Rumsfeld, the secretary of defense, and Gen. Tommy Franks, the commander of American forces in Afghanistan, decided not to augment the tiny force of special operations troops on the ground with sufficient force to capture or kill Mr. bin Laden and his deputies.


A Crushing Legacy of Bush | The New York Observer

A Crushing Legacy of Bush | The New York Observer: "It would be much less fair, however, to ignore the events that led us to this moment, when whatever choice he makes will offer no great guarantee of progress and no small prospect of trouble.

Those events began with the inexplicable decision by officials of the previous administration to allow Osama bin Laden, Ayman al-Zawahiri and other ranking leaders of Al Qaeda to escape from Afghanistan to Pakistan in December 2001. At the time, as a new Senate report on the battle of Tora Bora recalls, Donald Rumsfeld, the secretary of defense, and Gen. Tommy Franks, the commander of American forces in Afghanistan, decided not to augment the tiny force of special operations troops on the ground with sufficient force to capture or kill Mr. bin Laden and his deputies."