Friday, September 30, 2005

Reuters AlertNet - IRAQ WRAPUP 3-Car bombs in Iraq kill more than 110 people

Reuters AlertNet - IRAQ WRAPUP 3-Car bombs in Iraq kill more than 110 people: "BALAD, Iraq, Sept 30 (Reuters) - Car bombs have killed more than 110 people, 25 of them children, in a surge of violence in Iraq ahead of an Oct. 15 referendum on a new constitution.

One of the four car bombs ripped through a crowded market in the southern town of Hilla killing at least 12 people and wounding 47 on Friday, police and health officials said.

In the mainly Shi'ite town of Balad, north of Baghdad, the death toll from three huge car bombs on Thursday rose to 98 on Friday, hospital director Kassim Aboud said.

Furious residents in Balad blamed the attacks on 'foreign fighters', long accused by the U.S. military of infiltrating Iraq from Syria to carry out attacks across the country.

'What have those Jordanians and Palestinians and Saudis got to do with us? Shame on them!' Abu Waleed, a hotel owner in Balad who said seven people staying in his hotel died in the blasts, shouted angrily."

Nation building is hard work. Working hard. Can I go potty?

Reuters AlertNet - Security incidents in Iraq, Sept 29

Reuters AlertNet - Security incidents in Iraq, Sept 29: "Sept 29 (Reuters) - The following are security incidents reported in Iraq on Thursday, Sept. 29, as of 1200 GMT.

U.S. and Iraqi forces are battling a Sunni Arab insurgency against the Shi'ite and Kurdish-led government in Baghdad.

BAGHDAD - Two people were killed and seven wounded when gunmen opened fire on a minibus in the eastern New Baghdad district of the capital, police said.

BAGHDAD - Two people were killed and one wounded when gunmen opened fire on a bakery in the southern Doura district of the capital, police said.

RAMADI - A U.S soldier was killed on Tuesday by small arms fire in Ramadi, 110 km (68 miles) west of Baghdad, the U.S. military said in a statement.

* KHALIS - The head of the city council was assassinated in this town, 70 km (45 miles) north of Baghdad, by gunmen. Police said two people with him were also wounded in the incident.

* KHALIS - A policeman and his brother were killed by gunmen in Khalis, police said.

* KIRKUK - A police colonel escaped death when a roadside bomb exploded near his convoy in Kirkuk, 250 km (150 miles) north of Baghdad, police said one of his guards was wounded.

(Reporting by Faris al-Mehdawi in Baquba, Mohammed Ramahi in Baghdad) "

Nation building is hard work. We're working hard. Can I go potty?

Today in History - Sept. 30

Today in History - Sept. 30: "In 1938, British, French, German and Italian leaders decided to appease Adolf Hitler by allowing Nazi annexation of Czechoslovakia's Sudetenland.

In 1946, an international military tribunal in Nuremberg, Germany, found 22 top Nazi leaders guilty of war crimes.

In 1949, the Berlin Airlift came to an end.

In 1954, the first atomic-powered vessel, the submarine Nautilus, was commissioned by the Navy.

In 1962, black student James Meredith succeeded on his fourth try in registering for classes at the University of Mississippi.

In 1993, an estimated 10,000 people were killed when an earthquake measuring a magnitude of 6.4 struck southern India.

Ten years ago: U.S. envoy Richard Holbrooke, trying to negotiate a Bosnian cease-fire, ended inconclusive talks with the Sarajevo government and headed for Belgrade to try his luck with the Serbs.

Five years ago: A Catholic priest crashed his car into a building housing an abortion clinic in Rockford, Ill., and attacked it with an ax. (The Rev. John Earl later pleaded guilty to damaging property, and was sentenced to 30 months' probation and two days in county jail.) In Sydney, Australia, Marion Jones won Olympic gold in the U.S. women's 1,600-meter relay and bronze with the 400-meter squad _ making her the only woman to win five track medals at one Olympics.

One year ago: President Bush and Sen. John Kerry met in their first debate, with Kerry charging Americans had been left with 'this incredible mess in Iraq' and Bush saying U.S. troops look at the Democratic challenger and wonder, 'How can I follow this guy?' The House followed the Senate in decisively rejecting a constitutional amendment banning gay marriage. Bombs killed some three dozen children in Baghdad as U.S. troops handed out candy at a government-sponsored celebration. Vioxx, the heavily promoted arthritis drug, was pulled from the market by its maker after a study found it doubled ..."

Wheee!

Wild gorillas spotted using tools for first time - Science - MSNBC.com

Wild gorillas spotted using tools for first time - Science - MSNBC.com: "WASHINGTON - Two female gorillas have been photographed using sticks as tools to get through swampy areas, the first time the apes have been seen doing so in the wild, researchers reported on Thursday."

This is huge, huge, huge, huge!

This means that some Gorillas are sentient. In other words, they know they are alive. They plan for the future. They are not just "animals" any more.

Post Comes With Renewed Scrutiny of Record - New York Times

Post Comes With Renewed Scrutiny of Record - New York Times: "In an interview, Mr. Blunt, , who was elected to the House in 1996, called the corruption charges baseless. He said the attacks against him would help discredit those against Mr. DeLay and other Republicans.

'I actually think that that may be the greatest favor they could do our party,' Mr. Blunt said, 'to show that this is just pattern, serial efforts to distort facts and make situations look differently than they are and try to attack people individually.'"

This is the tactic used by Republicans to gain control of the House. They are very well prepared to defend themselves as it is their plan and I'm usre they have every mode of propaganda as a defense ready and researched.

Thursday, September 29, 2005

adn.com | environment : Arctic ice meltdown continues rapid pace

adn.com | environment : Arctic ice meltdown continues rapid pace: "Arctic sea ice has melted back farther this year than in 25 years of satellite monitoring, marking the fourth consecutive summer with 'a stunning reduction' in the polar pack north of Alaska, Asia and Europe, according to scientists at the National Snow and Ice Data Center and NASA."

Global warming? What nonsense! not.

World Crises | Reuters.com

World Crises | Reuters.com: "Sept 29 (Reuters) - Following are security incidents reported in Iraq on Thursday, Sept. 29, as of 0600 GMT.

U.S. and Iraqi forces are battling a Sunni Arab insurgency against the Shi'ite and Kurdish-led government in Baghdad.

BAGHDAD - Two people were killed and seven wounded when gunmen opened fire on a minibus in the eastern New Baghdad district of the capital, police said.

BAGHDAD - Two people were killed and one wounded when gunmen opened fire on a bakery in the southern Doura district of the capital, police said.

RAMADI - A U.S soldier was killed on Tuesday by small arms fire in Ramadi, 110 km (68 miles) to the west of Baghdad, the U.S. military said in a statement."

Nation building is hard work! We are working hard! Can I go potty?

Today in History - Sept. 29

Today in History - Sept. 29: "In 1918, Allied forces scored a decisive breakthrough of the Hindenburg Line during World War I.

In 1943, General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Italian Marshal Pietro Badoglio signed an armistice aboard the British ship Nelson off Malta.

In 1955, a one-act version of the Arthur Miller play 'A View From the Bridge' opened in New York. (Miller later turned it into a two-act play.)

In 1963, the second session of Second Vatican Council opened in Rome.

In 1979, Pope John Paul II became the first pope to visit Ireland as he arrived for a three-day tour.

In 1982, seven people in the Chicago area died after unwittingly taking Extra-Strength Tylenol capsules laced with cyanide.

In 1988, the space shuttle Discovery blasted off from Cape Canaveral, Fla., marking America's return to manned space flight following the Challenger disaster.

In 1994, the House voted to end the age-old practice of lobbyists buying meals and entertainment for members of Congress.

Ten years ago: Calif. Gov. Pete Wilson abandoned his bid for the 1996 Republican presidential nomination. The O.J. Simpson trial was sent to the jury. Three U.S. servicemen were indicted in the rape of a 12-year-old Okinawan girl and handed over to Japanese authorities. (They were later convicted.)

Five years ago: Israeli riot police stormed a major Jerusalem shrine and opened fire on stone-throwing Muslim worshippers, killing four Palestinians and wounding 175.

One year ago: A video surfaced showing Kenneth Bigley, a British hostage held by Iraqi militants, pleading for help between the bars of a makeshift cage. (Bigley was later killed.) The privately built SpaceShipOne rocket plane hurtled past the edge of earth's atmosphere, completing the first stage of a quest to win the $10 million Ansari X Prize."

Wheee!

Reuters Politics Summary

Reuters Politics Summary: "Blunt picked to replace DeLay as US House leader


WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday unanimously elected Roy Blunt of Missouri as their majority leader, replacing Tom DeLay, who was forced to step down after being indicted by a Texas grand jury, lawmakers said. After a closed-door meeting of House Republicans, lawmakers said Blunt's position was an interim arrangement for the rest of the year and that he would share some leadership responsibilities with Rep. David Dreier of California. Blunt had been the third-ranking Republican member of the House with the title of majority whip.

Senate set to confirm Roberts

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - John Roberts, a 50-year-old conservative who told Congress judges should act like impartial umpires, seems certain to win Senate confirmation on Thursday to become the 17th chief justice of the United States. All 55 Senate Republicans and about half the chamber's other members -- 44 Democrats and one independent -- were expected to back Roberts, President George W. Bush's nominee to head the Supreme Court.

Hurricane bonds crucial to Gulf recovery-governors

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Expanded use of tax-exempt bonds are crucial to rebuilding shattered Gulf Coast economies, the governors of Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi told U.S. senators on Wednesday. In a hearing before the Senate Finance Committee, Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco said she placed a high priority on congressional authority for a proposed $30 billion in private activity 'Hurricane Recovery Bonds' to rebuild key businesses and bring jobs back to her state.

DeLay case gives US Democrats new political punch

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The indictment of House No. 2 Tom DeLay on Wednesday added to a growing list of political woes for Republicans ahead of next year's congressional elections, providing new fuel for Democratic charges that Republicans"

Well that's interesting.

Friday, September 23, 2005

Johnson dies from injuries sustained in title loss - Yahoo! News

Johnson dies from injuries sustained in title loss - Yahoo! News: "He was taken immediately to University Medical Center for the emergency surgery and a second operation was performed on Monday but there was too much damage to allow him to survive."

How many times does this have to happen? Head gear for the love of Gawd head gear.

Reuters AlertNet - Security incidents in Iraq, Sept 23

Reuters AlertNet - Security incidents in Iraq, Sept 23: "Sept 23 (Reuters) - Following are security incidents reported in Iraq on Friday, Sept. 23, as of 1000 GMT.

U.S. and Iraqi forces are battling a Sunni Arab insurgency against the Shi'ite and Kurdish-led government in Baghdad.

*BAGHDAD - Five people were killed and eight wounded when a suicide bomber in a vehicle blew himself up at a bus station in central Baghdad, police said.

*RAMADI - One U.S soldier was killed by small arms fire on Thursday in Ramadi, 110 km (68 miles) west of Baghdad, said a statement released by the U.S military.

*KHALIS -Iraqi security forces conducted a raid and arrested 10 people in Khalis, 15 km north of Baquba.

MOSUL - Three officials in the Turkmen Front were killed and one wounded on Thursday by gunmen in Mosul, 390 km (240 miles) north of Baghdad. An official in the group said they were attacked while leaving their office.

MOSUL - One policeman was killed on Thursday by gunmen in Mosul, a police source said.

MOSUL - Bodies of six people who were shot dead were found on Thursday and Friday in different areas of Mosul, a medical source said.

BALAD - One U.S soldier was killed and another wounded on Thursday when a roadside exploded near their patrol near Balad, 110 km (70 miles) north of Baghdad, said a statement released by the U.S military. (Reporting by Maher al-Thanoon in Mosul) "

Nation building is hard work. We are working hard.
When we leave the islamic governement takes over tha the first order of business will be explaining just how much they hate us.

Today in History - Sept. 23

Today in History - Sept. 23: "In 1952, Republican vice-presidential candidate Richard M. Nixon went on television to deliver what came to be known as the 'Checkers' speech as he refuted allegations of improper campaign financing.

In 1957, nine black students who had entered Little Rock Central High School in Arkansas were forced to withdraw because of a white mob outside.

In 1962, New York's Philharmonic Hall (since renamed Avery Fisher Hall) formally opened as the first unit of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

In 1973, former Argentine president Juan Peron was returned to power.

Ten years ago: In a wide-ranging interview aboard Air Force One, President Clinton admitted he had tended in the past to get hung up on details, and pledged to do a better job in providing reassuring leadership to Americans confused by tumultuous times.

Five years ago: At the Sydney Olympics, Marion Jones won the women's 100-meter final in 10.75 seconds; Maurice Greene took the men's 100 in 9.87 seconds. Commentator Carl T. Rowan died in Washington at age 75.

One year ago: President Bush denied painting too rosy a picture about Iraq, and said he would consider sending more troops if asked; Iraq's interim leader, Ayad Allawi, standing with Bush in the White House Rose Garden, said additional troops weren't needed. Congress extended three middle-class tax cuts in a $146 billion package."

Wheee!

Salon.com News | Get his robes ready - NP

Salon.com News | Get his robes ready - NP: "The leading generals in the fight to defeat the Supreme Court confirmation of John G. Roberts Jr. could not even get a seat in the room. As the Judiciary Committee gathered Thursday to vote their approval of Roberts, Ralph Neas, the head of People for the American Way, and Nan Aron, the head of the Alliance for Justice, stood in the back corner, crushed together with journalists and spectators like cigarettes in a new pack. Just an arm's length away, Roberts' supporters, including Leonard Leo of the conservative Federalist Society, sat comfortably in reserved seats."

Good Bye personal rights, individual rights and Roe V. Wade... Hello more government "rights", more religious overtones in American law and corporate "rights".

Wednesday, September 21, 2005

Sky Showbiz - Police Investigate Kate

Sky Showbiz - Police Investigate Kate: "Following the news that she's been dumped by fashion label H&M, the police have now confirmed that the supermodel is under investigation after pictures showed her allegedly snorting cocaine."

You mean the "super" models have that wasted drug abuser look because they are wasted drug abusers? Say it isn't so!

Top News Article | Reuters.com

Top News Article | Reuters.com: "BAGHDAD (Reuters) - A bomb blast killed a U.S. security officer near the northern Iraqi city of Mosul on Monday, the U.S. embassy said on Tuesday.

A statement on the embassy website said Stephen Eric Sullivan, a State Department security officer, was killed by a roadside bomb attack on a convoy.

'Sullivan was one of nine Americans who lost their lives in Iraq September 19-20, according to press reports,' said the statement."

Hard work. Working hard. Can I go potty?

Top News Article | Reuters.co.uk

Top News Article | Reuters.co.uk: "'Our Iraqi security forces in general, and these in particular and in many parts of Iraq, I have to admit that they have been penetrated by some of the insurgents, some of the terrorists as well,' National Security Adviser Mowaffaq al-Rubaie told the BBC on Tuesday."

What is that sound?

Reuters AlertNet - Security incidents in Iraq, Sept 21

Reuters AlertNet - Security incidents in Iraq, Sept 21: "Sept 21 (Reuters) - Following are security incidents reported in Iraq on Wednesday, Sept. 21, as of 0800 GMT.

U.S. and Iraqi forces are battling a Sunni Arab insurgency against the Shi'ite and Kurdish-led government in Baghdad.

BAGHDAD - Two bodies were found in the Shula district of northwestern Baghdad. They were bound and shot dead and there were signs of torture on their bodies, police said.

MOSUL - A journalist working for Assafir newspaper was killed on Tuesday by gunmen in Mosul, 390 km (240 miles) north of Baghdad. The chairman of a journalist's syndicate said he was killed near his house.

HILLA - A cleric was wounded when a bomb was planted in front of his house near Hilla, 100 km (60 miles) south of Baghdad, police said.

HILLA - One person was kidnapped by gunmen near Hilla. police said Jabbar Hameed Mufid was a former member of the dissolved Baath Party."

Nation building is hard work.

Today in History - Sept. 21

Today in History - Sept. 21: "In 1981, the Senate unanimously confirmed the nomination of Sandra Day O'Connor to become the first female justice on the Supreme Court.

In 1989, Hurricane Hugo, packing winds of up to 135 mph, crashed into Charleston, S.C.

Ten years ago: House Republicans unveiled partial details of their plan for Medicare aimed at achieving $270 billion in savings over seven years.

Five years ago: An Iranian appeals court reduced the prison terms for 10 Jews convicted of 'cooperating' with Israel, in a case that had drawn international criticism.

One year ago: President Bush, defending his decision to invade Iraq, urged the U.N. General Assembly to stand united with the country's struggling government. Yusuf Islam, formerly known as singer Cat Stevens, was taken off a London-to-Washington United Airlines flight because his name had shown up on a government 'no-fly' list. The death toll in Haiti from deluges caused by Tropical Storm Jeanne topped 700."

Wheee!

Tuesday, September 20, 2005

Reuters AlertNet - Al Qaeda training ground shifts to Iraq -UN panel

Reuters AlertNet - Al Qaeda training ground shifts to Iraq -UN panel: "NITED NATIONS, Sept 19 (Reuters) - The al Qaeda terror network has capitalized on the insurgency in Iraq by creating a new training ground to replace the bases it lost in Afghanistan in 2001, a U.N. expert panel said on Monday.

The chaos in Iraq will thereby likely increase the danger of future terrorist attacks considerably, the panel said in its latest status report to the U.N. Security Council on al Qaeda and Afghanistan's former Taliban leaders."

W makes the world less safe. SOS.

Reuters AlertNet - Security incidents in Iraq, Sept 19

Reuters AlertNet - Security incidents in Iraq, Sept 19: "Sept 19 (Reuters) - Following are security incidents reported in Iraq on Monday, Sept. 19, as of 1215 GMT.

U.S. and Iraqi forces are battling a Sunni Arab insurgency against the Shi'ite and Kurdish-led government in Baghdad.

MAHMUDIYA - Two car bombs killed eight people travelling on the road from Baghdad to the Shi'ite holy city of Kerbala where hundreds of thousands of pilgrims are gathering for a religious festival. Police said the bombs struck in the towns of Mahmudiya and Latifiya, killing one civilian and seven police.

BASRA - An Iraqi reporter for the New York Times was found dead in the southern city of Basra after being kidnapped by masked men, family members and a doctor said. Fakher Haider, who had worked for the Times for 2-1/2 years, was found with his hands bound and a single bullet wound to the head. (Reporting by Faris al-Mehdawi and Abdel-Razzak Hameed in Basra) "

Nation building is "hard work".

Today in History - Sept. 20

Today in History - Sept. 20: "In 1958, civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr. was seriously wounded during an appearance at a New York City department store when an apparently deranged woman stabbed him in the chest.

In 1962, black student James Meredith was blocked from enrolling at the University of Mississippi by Gov. Ross R. Barnett. (Meredith was later admitted.)

In 1973, in their so-called 'battle of the sexes,' tennis star Billie Jean King defeated Bobby Riggs in straight sets, 6-4, 6-3, 6-3, at the Houston Astrodome.

In 1973, singer-songwriter Jim Croce died in a plane crash near Natchitoches, La.; he was 30.

In 1980, 'Spectacular Bid,' ridden by Bill Shoemaker, ran as the only entry in the Woodward Stakes at Belmont Park in New York after three potential challengers dropped out in horse racing's first walkover since 1949.

In 1984, a suicide car bomber attacked the U.S. Embassy annex in north Beirut, killing a dozen people.

Ten years ago: In a move that stunned Wall Street, AT&T Corp. announced it was splitting into three companies. The House voted to drop the national speed limit and let states decide how fast people should drive. Bosnian Serb rebels pulled back enough heavy weapons from around Sarajevo to keep NATO airstrikes at bay.

Five years ago: Independent Counsel Robert Ray announced the end of the Whitewater investigation, saying there was insufficient evidence to warrant charges against President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton. Former Soviet cosmonaut Gherman Titov died at age 65.

One year ago: CBS News apologized for a 'mistake in judgment' in its story questioning President Bush's National Guard service, saying it could not vouch for the authenticity of documents featured in the report. A video posted on a Web site showed the beheading of a man identified as American civil engineer Eugene Armstrong."

Wheee!

Ex-Tyco Executives Get 8 to 25 Years in Prison - New York Times

Ex-Tyco Executives Get 8 to 25 Years in Prison - New York Times: "L. Dennis Kozlowski, the former chief executive of Tyco International who was convicted of looting the company of $150 million, was sentenced yesterday to 81/3 to 25 years in a New York State prison, the latest corporate figure to be handed a lengthy prison term in a corruption case."

Enron?

BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Moon plan 'comes up short'

BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Moon plan 'comes up short': "'It's the same basic approach as Apollo: disposable (mostly) spacecraft, on big Nasa-proprietary boosters, flown a few times a year, by a standing army of Nasa and contractor employees. This is Apollo 2.0.'"


Why?

N. Korea Sets Condition on Nuclear Pact - Los Angeles Times

N. Korea Sets Condition on Nuclear Pact - Los Angeles Times: "# The day after pledging to end its arms program, the regime puts the deal in doubt by demanding that the U.S. first provide it with a light-water reactor."

W to the rescue!

Tuesday, September 13, 2005

WAKEMAN Ohio Sherif

WAKEMAN, Ohio -- Sheriff's deputies removed 11 children from a home where they were locked in cages less than 3 1/2 feet high, authorities said.
The children's adoptive and foster parents, Mike and Sharen Gravelle, denied that they'd abused or neglected the children during a custody hearing Monday in Huron County. No charges had been filed as of Monday night.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/09/13/AR2005091300284.html

Friday, September 09, 2005

Reuters AlertNet - Security incidents in Iraq, Sept 9

Reuters AlertNet - Security incidents in Iraq, Sept 9: "BAGHDAD, Sept 9 (Reuters) - Following are security incidents reported in Iraq on Friday, Sept. 9, as of 0815 GMT.

U.S. and Iraqi forces are battling a Sunni Arab insurgency against the Shi'ite and Kurdish-led government in Baghdad.

BAGHDAD - One policeman was killed and five wounded when unknown gunmen fired on their patrol in western Baghdad, police said.

BAGHDAD - One civilian was injured when a roadside bomb exploded targeting a Shi'ite mosque in southern Baghdad on Thursday, police said."

Nation building is hard work.

Afro-Americans, oil is more valuable than you! (by Yamin Zakaria) - Media Monitors Network (MMN)

Afro-Americans, oil is more valuable than you! (by Yamin Zakaria) - Media Monitors Network (MMN): "Barbra Bush, she said: “So many of the people in the arena here, you know, were underprivileged anyway, so this is working very well for them.'"

The Bush family values.

Today in History - Sept. 9

Today in History - Sept. 9: "In 1943, Allied forces landed at Salerno and Taranto during World War II.

In 1948, the People's Democratic Republic of Korea (North Korea) was created.

In 1957, President Eisenhower signed into law the first civil rights bill to pass Congress since Reconstruction.

In 1971, prisoners seized control of the maximum-security Attica Correctional Facility near Buffalo, N.Y., beginning a siege that ended up claiming 43 lives.

In 1976, Communist Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung died in Beijing at age 82.

In 1993, PLO leaders and Israel agreed to recognize each other, clearing the way for a peace accord.

In 1997, Sinn Fein, the IRA's political ally, formally renounced violence as it took its place in talks on Northern Ireland's future.

Ten years ago: Bosnian Serbs blamed U.N. forces for a shell that killed 10 people at a Bosnian Serb hospital the day before. Amtrak's Broadway Limited service between New York and Chicago made its final run.

Five years ago: President Clinton proposed spending about $1.6 billion to help communities recover from recent Western wildfires. Venus Williams beat Lindsay Davenport 6-4, 7-5 for the U.S. Open women's singles championship, her first Grand Slam title.

One year ago: Secretary of State Colin Powell told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee that abuses by government-supported Arab militias in Sudan qualified as genocide against the black African population in the Darfur region. A powerful car bomb exploded outside the Australian Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia, killing 10 people."

Wheee!

Thursday, September 08, 2005

Health News Article | Reuters.co.uk

Health News Article | Reuters.co.uk: "WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. regulators want Pfizer Inc.'s inhaled insulin powder to be scrutinized by an advisory panel for any adverse effects on the lungs or blood sugar levels, documents released on Wednesday show.

Exubera is being developed with Sanofi-Aventis and Nektar Therapeutics, and is due to be reviewed by an FDA advisory panel on Thursday.

Some analysts project it may generate sales of as much as $2 billion a year if it goes to market.

Like injectable insulin, Exubera may push blood sugar levels too low, which can cause fainting and other side effects, and some Exubera patients also experienced a decline in lung function that may be reversible, the FDA staff said.

'The prospect of being able to use insulin while avoiding some... or all... of the injections historically part and parcel of insulin therapy stands to appeal to many patients, family members and physicians,' wrote Dr. David Orloff, director of the FDA's division of metabolic and endocrine drug products.

'It is essential that we and they understand the benefits and risks of this novel drug-device combination,' Orloff said.

In a separate summary on the FDA's Web site, Pfizer said Exubera was 'well-tolerated and safe' for diabetic adults and that risks would be explained on the product's label."

Just wait. I predict several hundred deaths within two years. Pfizer lies and is hiding facts... Production problems. Conisistent doses/potency. Contamination issues.

Today in history: September 8 - Education - MSNBC.com

Today in history: September 8 - Education - MSNBC.com: "In 1974, President Ford granted an unconditional pardon to former President Nixon.

In 1975, Boston’s public schools began their court-ordered citywide busing program amid scattered incidents of violence.

In 1994, a U.S. Air Boeing 737 crashed into a ravine as it was approaching Pittsburgh International Airport, killing all 132 people on board.

Ten years ago: Bosnia’s warring sides reached a compromise in Geneva, agreeing to divide the nation into two states: one for the rebel Serbs and another for the Muslims and Croats.

Five years ago: World leaders ended the United Nations Millennium Summit with a pledge to solve humankind’s problems, including poverty, war, AIDS, pollution and human rights abuses. The head of the Bureau of Indian Affairs apologized for the federal agency’s “legacy of racism and inhumanity” that included massacres, forced relocations of tribes and attempts to wipe out Indian cultures.

One year ago: CBS’ “60 Minutes Wednesday” aired a report questioning President Bush’s National Guard service; however, CBS News ended up apologizing for a “mistake in judgment” after memos featured in the report were challenged as forgeries. The Genesis space capsule, which had orbited the sun for three years, crashed to Earth when its parachutes failed to deploy. Richard G. Butler, founder of the Aryan Nations, was found dead in his bed in Hayden, Idaho; he was 86."

Wheee!

CNN.com - American, Iraqi captives freed in Iraq - Sep 7, 2005

CNN.com - American, Iraqi captives freed in Iraq - Sep 7, 2005: "Acting on a tip from a detainee, coalition forces rescued two hostages, including an American held hostage since November, the U.S. military said Wednesday.

Roy Hallums and an Iraqi man were freed 'from captivity in an isolated farm house located 15 miles south of Baghdad,' the military said."

good.

Wednesday, September 07, 2005

Reuters AlertNet - Security incidents in Iraq, Sept 7

Reuters AlertNet - Security incidents in Iraq, Sept 7: "Sept 7 (Reuters) - Following are security incidents reported in Iraq on Wednesday, Sept. 7, as of 0730 GMT.

U.S. and Iraqi forces are battling a Sunni Arab insurgency against the Shi'ite and Kurdish-led government in Baghdad.

BASRA - A sports utility vehicle was damaged by a roadside bomb on Wednesday morning and at least two apparently dead westerners were pulled from the wreckage, television pictures showed. The British military and the British consulate said no British military or diplomatic personnel were involved.

A spokesman for the U.S. embassy could not confirm whether U.S. vehicles were involved but said they were seeking information on the incident.

BAGHDAD - Iraqi police said six people were injured, including a U.S national, after a parked car blew up next to a sports utility vehicle, often used by contractors and officials in southern Baghdad. (Reporting by Mussab Al-Khairalla and Huda Majeed Saleh in Baghdad) "

Nation building is *hard* work.

So long, little buddy

So long, little buddy: "For my generation of latchkey kids, there was no better supplemental TV friend than Gilligan.

Gilligan was Bob Denver, who died Friday at age 70 of complications from cancer treatment. Earlier this year he had undergone quadruple-bypass surgery."

Gilligan!

Guardian Unlimited | World Latest | New Orleans Mayor Orders Forced Evacuation

Guardian Unlimited | World Latest | New Orleans Mayor Orders Forced Evacuation: "As of Tuesday night, workers had recovered 196 bodies in Mississippi, the majority coming from coastal counties. Nagin has estimated New Orleans' dead could reach 10,000."

America under the facists.

USATODAY.com - Nominee's stance less clear on key issues

USATODAY.com - Nominee's stance less clear on key issues: "Abortion/ women's rights

Rehnquist. Voted against the court's 1973 ruling in Roe v. Wade, which made abortion legal nationwide. Opposed abortion rights in subsequent cases, including a 1992 dispute that affirmed Roe.

Roberts. As a lawyer in the George H.W. Bush administration, signed a brief that said, 'Roe was wrongly decided.' Roberts has never made public his personal views on abortion rights.

Affirmative action

Rehnquist. Voted against state and federal programs intended to give women and racial minorities a boost on the job or in public contracting. In 2003, he dissented when the court endorsed affirmative action in law school admissions at the University of Michigan.

Roberts. As a government lawyer, advocated scaling back of government affirmative action; as deputy solicitor general in the George H.W. Bush administration, argued against a federal program that favored blacks and other minorities in order to increase their ownership of broadcast licenses; personal views unknown.

Religion's role in government

Rehnquist. Voted for state and local laws that encouraged prayer in schools. Endorsed school 'vouchers' that allow parents to use public money to pay tuition at private schools. Supported other public funding of religious activities.

Roberts. As deputy solicitor general, sided with a public school that wanted prayer at a graduation ceremony. In his writings as a government lawyer he suggested a lower wall separating church and state."

The Supreme Court gets New Orleansed.

Today in history: September 7 - Education - MSNBC.com

Today in history: September 7 - Education - MSNBC.com: "In 1940, Nazi Germany began its initial blitz on London during World War II.

In 1963, the National Professional Football Hall of Fame was dedicated in Canton, Ohio.

In 1969, Senate Republican leader Everett M. Dirksen died in Washington D.C.

In 1977, the Panama Canal treaties, calling for the U.S. to eventually turn over control of the waterway to Panama, were signed in Washington.

In 1979, the Entertainment and Sports Programming Network (ESPN) made its cable TV debut.

In 1990, Kimberly Bergalis of Fort Pierce, Fla., came forward to identify herself as the young woman who had been infected with AIDS, apparently by her late dentist. (Bergalis died the following year.)

Ten years ago: After 27 years in the Senate, Bob Packwood, R-Ore., announced he would resign, heading off a vote by colleagues to expel him for allegations of sexual and official misconduct. The space shuttle Endeavour thundered into orbit with five astronauts on a mission to release and recapture a pair of science satellites.

Five years ago: A jury in Coeur D’Alene, Idaho, awarded $6.3 million to a woman and her son who had been attacked by Aryan Nations guards outside the white supremacist group’s north Idaho headquarters.

One year ago: An Associated Press tally showed that U.S. military deaths in the Iraq campaign had passed the 1,000 mark. Former Mississippi Gov. Kirk Fordice died in Jackson, Miss., at age 70."

Wheee!