Thursday, July 28, 2005

Today in History - July 28

Today in History - July 28: "In 1868, the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, guaranteeing due process of law, was declared in effect.

In 1896, the city of Miami, Fla., was incorporated.

In 1932, Federal troops forcibly dispersed the so-called Bonus Army of World War I veterans who had gathered in Washington to demand money they weren't scheduled to receive until 1945.

In 1945, the U.S. Senate ratified the United Nations Charter by a vote of 89-2.

In 1965, President Johnson announced he was increasing the number of American troops in South Vietnam from 75,000 to 125,000.

In 1977, Roy Wilkins turned over leadership of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to Benjamin L. Hooks.

In 2002, nine coal miners trapped in the flooded Quecreek Mine in Somerset, Pa., were rescued after 77 hours underground.

Ten years ago: A jury in Union, S.C., rejected the death penalty for Susan Smith, sentencing her instead to life in prison for drowning her two young sons. (Smith will be eligible for parole in 2024).

Five years ago: Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori was sworn in for an unprecedented third term of office, infuriating demonstrators who set government buildings ablaze."

Whee!

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